There are  a lot of very dull, unimaginative push up regimes on the internet. My aim is to get you 100 push ups in,  about, 6 weeks.

For the purposes of this page, im going to assume you can do 10 strict push ups in one go.

The 1st thing i need you to do is to do a test, one today, one tomorrow. today I want you to attempt the most continuous  push ups you can. Record it.

Tomorrow,  I want you to attempt as many push ups as you can in 2 minutes . You can take as many breaks as you like, you can do lots of singles. Does not matter. Just do as many as you can in 2 minutes.

This gives you an interesting base line to begin with. 

 For now, you have two alternating protocols to follow 

1) Without being too prescriptive, I need you to get to 10 sets of 10 push ups, with no more than 90 seconds rest.  At this stage, this means, shooting for 10 reps, then resting for 90 seconds, so the reps  could look like this.

10, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 4, 6, 8. 

2) 3 sets of maximum push ups. go down and do as many push ups as you can, rest 2 minutes, then do it again 2 more times.

So, do 1 on day 1, 2 on day 2, then a rest day. then 1 and 2 again. 

That should get you started for now. 

After each Push up session, do this basic chest building stretch.

 

BUT WHAT IF YOU HAVE NO PUSH UPS. Ive seen lots of people with no push ups struggling on "box" and knee versions. Whilst they are interesting if you are really really weak, i have never seen anyone successfully get a full push up by using these shortened versions. The 2 best techniques  to use are  the eccentric phase and Isometrics. Put simpley, get into the top of a push up, and lower yourself down as slowly as you can. Do this 4 or 5 times with 60 seconds rest ( more if you need it.). Then while lying on the floor, try and push yourself up. Put as much effort in as you can, and push for 7 seconds. Rest for 30 seconds and go again. ( say 4 times). You may not move, but you are building the specific strength to do so.